Log in |

Courses

icon representing professional development courses

Search results

Professional Training in the Historic Environment

Key facts

TypesProfessional Development
Short Courses
Subject area(s)Archaeology
Architectural History
FeesThe fee for each course is given with the course description below. (You may pay by instalment.)
Application statusSee course details
Course contactIf you have any questions about this course, please email professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk or telephone 01865 270380.

Overview

As part of its capacity-building activities, English Heritage, in partnership with Oxford University Department for Continuing Education, is supporting a range of historic environment short courses, particularly in areas where there are identifiable skills gaps. English Heritage also provides many of the expert speakers to deliver these courses. The Professional Training in the Historic Environment programme is run in association with the Archaeology Training Forum (ATF), the Institute for Archaeologists (IfA) and Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC).

Programme details

Please see our 2014 courses as listed below. Click on each link to see full course details.



Investigating First World War Archaeological & Architectural Legacies
Wednesday 5 February 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-326

Social Media in the Historic Environment
Thursday 20 February 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-327

Archaeological Survey using Airborne Lidar
Tuesday 25 February 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-367

Environmental Assessment and the Cultural Heritage
Thursday 27 – Friday 28 February 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-329

Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing
Monday 3 – Tuesday 4 March 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-325

Public Inquiry Workshop
Wednesday 12 – Friday 14 March 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-362

Marine Development and the Historic Environment
Tuesday 18 – Wednesday 19 March 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-333

Researching Historic Visual Sources
Thursday 20 March 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-334

Heritage Values and the Assessment of Significance
Tuesday 25 – Wednesday 26 March 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-335

An Introduction to Architecture for Archaeologists
Thursday 3 – Friday 4 April 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-363

The Setting of Heritage Assets and Places: Current Approaches
Tuesday 8 – Wednesday 9 April 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-338

Conserving and Enhancing Historic Designed Landscapes
Wednesday 21 – Thursday 22 May 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-340

Stable Isotope Analysis of Human and Animal Bone
Friday 23 May 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-366

Building Survey Week: analysing and recording historic buildings
Monday 26 – Friday 30 May 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-361

Making use of Historic Landscape Characterisation
Wednesday 11 June 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-391

Developing Participation in Community Archaeology
Friday 13 June 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-344

Aerial Photography: Archaeological Interpretation and Mapping for Research and Heritage Protection
Wednesday 9 - Thursday 10 July 2014
www.conted.ox.ac.uk/V400-392

Programme schedule

Thursday 01 January 1970
2014 marks the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War and many organisations are planning commemorative projects over the period 2014-2019. Since the millennium archaeological techniques have increasingly been applied to study of First World War battlefields in France and the Near East, and on training areas in England. The aim of this course is to inform curators, field practitioners, consultants, and leaders of voluntary projects of the diverse physical legacy that the war has left in England. It will also introduce a methodology that will allow voluntary groups and individuals to get involved with documenting this legacy.
Fees from: £195.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
Social media brings new levels of speed, access and mobility to how we share professional networks, reach new audiences, involve supporters, and build relationships with potential project partners. This course will give you an understanding of how and why historic environment professionals are using social media and will provide an awareness of emerging trends. It will enable you to make informed decisions about how social media can meet the needs of your organization, or project, and the needs of your target audience; what tools to use and how to use them; and how to resource, manage and sustain your social media activity. Barriers to using social media will also be addressed. The course will be of interest to historic environment professionals who are considering using, or are just starting to use, social media applications. It will also be of interest to those who are looking to increase the reach and impact of their social media and those concerned with the sustainability and resourcing of social media components to their research.
Fees from: £195.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
Archaeological survey using airborne lidar is a relatively new technique to be added to the toolbox of the archaeological surveyor, and when used in the appropriate circumstances it can reveal archaeological remains in exceptional detail. This course informs historic environment professionals of the potential and practical use of lidar data and lidar-derived imagery for research and heritage management.

The course is designed for a professional audience, particularly those who are currently involved in research, fieldwork and the planning process and who are aware of lidar, but have little or no practical experience with its use.

Fees from: £195.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
This course aims to inform participants about the principles of environmental assessment and its role in managing how the cultural heritage is affected by development, both at strategic and project levels. The principles and good practice standards that the course will cover have much wider application than just to the formal environmental assessment processes. It should appeal to anyone with a background or interest in planning and/or heritage conservation, operating in commercial, national agency, local authority, independent and university environments.
Fees from: £360.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
Through a series of presentations, practical sessions and group discussions, this course will explore the importance of digital preservation for the long term safety of archaeological data and provide practical guidance on how to prepare, curate, deposit and access digital data. The course will also provide guidance on data publishing online and introduce Linked Open Data for archaeology. The course is aimed primarily at archaeology data creators and data curators operating in national agency and local authority heritage environments. However this course will also be of benefit to professionals working in commercial, independent and research environments and to community groups utilising and creating archaeological data. The course will be of particular interest to those who maintain large data sets and need to efficiently manage, effectively preserve and provide access to their data for the future.
Fees from: £360.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
This practical course introduces potential witnesses and advocates to the techniques and procedures of Public Inquiries dealing with the historic environment. Training will be given in the preparation of proofs of evidence and a mock Inquiry will be staged in front of an experienced Inspector and led by practising advocates. The Inquiry process will be videoed as a basis for detailed feedback. The course will be particularly useful to those who have to appear, or expect that they may have to appear, as a professional witness at a Public Inquiry. This is likely to include local authority staff, consultants, English Heritage staff and staff of amenity societies.

Max number of participants in the mock Inquiry: 14. A further 6 places are available for people wishing to observe but not take a role in the mock Inquiry - if you wish to have an observer role, then please note this on your enrolment form.

Fees from: £495.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
This course will provide an introduction to how the historic environment should be included within coastal and marine development projects. Particular emphasis will be directed at Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and therefore it will appeal to developers who commission EIA and professional consultants who coordinate and produce EIA.

The course content is designed to explain the legal and policy frameworks which govern management of the historic environment and how assessment of risk to the known and unknown historic environment should be assessed through EIA. A crucial aspect is also to give full consideration to how data gathering programmes (e.g. geophysical and geotechnical survey) have much wider application than only engineering objectives. Therefore to support learning we will use worked examples to demonstrate corroboration of desk-based sources of information with survey data to allow full appreciation of how historic environment interests may be impacted by development projects. In addition, attention will also focus on the standards that govern how archaeological projects are conducted and the importance and relevance of completed programmes of analysis and subsequent public access to archaeological reports which can deliver agreed mitigation measures. An important matter also to be included is the determination of how the setting of coastal heritage assets (e.g. designated sites) might be impacted by marine developments and we will explain the role of English Heritage in providing advice about such matters. Broader historic context will be discussed with attention directed at the English Heritage Historic Seascape Characterisation programme.

The course is aimed at developers who require EIA to support proposed projects and professional environmental consultants responsible for commissioning EIA programmes of work, inclusive of specialist sub-contractors who conduct archaeological studies within the coastal and marine environment.

Fees from: £360.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
Visual sources, including maps, topographical views, architectural drawings, plans and early photographs, often provide the most valuable evidence for dating and interpreting historic buildings and sites. This course will introduce the range of material available for British sites from the 16th to the 20th centuries and provide practical and up to date guidance on how this material can be obtained, used and interpreted. Using real case studies, we will examine the contribution historic visual source material can make to our understanding of buildings and sites.

Fees from: £195.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
Significance is now a core concept within our planning process. Its assessment is a key part of management and of development within the historic environment. This course will introduce the process, show you what is involved in preparing assessments of significance, teach you how to structure, read and judge such assessments, and explore the ways in which they can be used. At the end, you should be convinced about the value of significance as a planning and management tool!

The course is open to all, but will be of particular interest to:
• Heritage asset managers and those providing advice to asset owners/managers;
• Planners who have to consider and determine applications affecting heritage assets;
• Historic environment professionals who wish to develop their skills in the assessment of significance and/or to improve their appreciation of
good/reliable and unsatisfactory assessments;
• Architects, surveyors, planners, project managers and other practitioners who do not specialise in heritage, but who will benefit from an
enhanced understanding of what is required from heritage assessments and how they can be used to guide change.

Fees from: £360.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
This course is a brief introduction to the development of English historic architecture and provides a simple ‘tool kit’ for archaeologists working on buildings or needing corroborating dating evidence to unravel more extensive sites or landscapes. It will outline approaches to the interpretation of architectural evidence and explore the evolution of architectural styles from the pre-Conquest period to the 20th century. It will also look at a series of key building types - especially churches, polite and vernacular housing, and industrial buildings - highlighting important issues and emphasising the principal characteristics which assist dating.

The course is aimed at archaeologists working in a range of research, fieldwork, planning and curatorial roles who find that buildings figure prominently in their workload or are likely to do so in the future.

Fees from: £360.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
The setting of buildings, monuments and historic areas is fundamental to how people appreciate the cultural value of historic places, but it is a complex and contentious issue for decision makers. In the context of relatively recent official guidance, this course explains why the setting of historic places matters. It also examines the principles of assessment and decision-making, and provides an opportunity to learn or enhance key practical skills.

The course will be of particular interest to those involved with heritage issues in planning decisions, especially major developments affecting sensitive locations. Such involvement could be as a planning or heritage consultant, planning officer, agency regulator, or historic environment curator; or alternatively as a member of a non-governmental organisation (NGO). It will also be of use to those who commission conservation plans, heritage assessments or specialist studies for strategic and project scale environmental assessments.

Fees from: £360.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
The new National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) sets out the Government’s planning policies for England and how these are expected to be applied. Development is expected to meet a three part sustainable development test: economic, social and environmental. How do historic parks and gardens fit in?

Although the Register of Parks and Gardens is statutory it does not confer additional controls like scheduled monuments. The NPPF and the planning system are therefore important tools in conserving and enhancing our designed landscape heritage and the NPPF introduces an important step change. Registered parks and gardens now have the same planning policy status as listed buildings and scheduled monuments. This course looks at impacts of developments on the significance of historic designed landscapes – both registered sites and sites of local significance - and how to define substantial harm to sites and their settings and views. The course will also discuss how to develop an informed approach and English Heritage’s conservation principles for historic parks and gardens.

The course will be of particular interest to conservation officers and others engaged in garden and landscape conservation, including property managers.

The course will include a site visit to look at settings and views issues.

Fees from: £360.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
This course aims to provide an up to date summary of the potential of stable isotope studies of human and faunal skeletal remains from archaeological sites, illustrated by case studies mainly from Britain.

Fees from: £195.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
This five-day practical course provides a general introduction to the understanding of historic buildings. It has a strong emphasis on practical, ‘portable’ skills and covers observation, investigation, analysis and recording of historic buildings. The tutors are historic building specialists from English Heritage.

The course will be of interest to all those who wish to acquire a grounding in the analysis and recording of historic buildings, including archaeologists, consultants and academics who wish to work more confidently with historic buildings and the evidence they embody; architectural historians and others who wish to develop skills in the analysis of building fabric; and planners, conservation officers, HER officers and others who wish to further their understanding of the skills and processes contributing to record creation.

Fees from: £545.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
Historic characterisation, the representation and interpretation of the historic attributes of place, has been an important tool available for those concerned with the wider historic environment and heritage management for more than twenty years. In England, the coverage of Historic Landscape Characterisation (HLC), undertaken by individual local authorities with support from English Heritage, is over 95% of the country and the Historic Seascape Characterisation is also nearing completion. Large parts of the countryside have been subjected to Historic Farmstead Characterisation and many urban areas have been subjected to metro-HLCs or Extensive Urban Surveys.

The approach was developed to raise awareness of the value of the whole historic environment, to support the work of a wide range of actors engaged in strategic planning, heritage management and partnership working, and to stimulate more detailed archaeological and historical research.

This day course reviews where we currently are with various forms of historic characterisation in England, discusses how they are being utilised at present, and how they may develop and be used in the future. The course is aimed at all those with an interest in the understanding, management, protection and presentation of the English historic landscape.


Fees from: £195.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
Community archaeology is evolving beyond more traditional approaches. Recent projects have drawn a range of people into active participation in the entire archaeological process. But such community projects are not straightforward to run. This course will provide information and ideas to help archaeologists design, launch and sustain community archaeology projects that involve diverse communities in archaeological work of all kinds. As well as discussing examples, guidance and sources of information the course will include workshop sessions and practical discussion.

This course will be of interest to archaeologists and heritage professionals working in commercial, national agency, academic, local authority and charitable organisations who want to develop community archaeology projects supporting the active participation of a wide range of people and groups.


Fees from: £195.00
Further details and booking instructions


Thursday 01 January 1970
Aerial Photography: Archaeological Interpretation and Mapping for Research and Heritage Protection

Aerial photographs, and the mapping derived from them, should form an intrinsic part of any assessment of the historic environment and a significant proportion of archaeological sites are identified through aerial survey. This course informs historic environment professionals of the potential and practical use of aerial photographs for research and heritage management.
Fees from: £360.00
Further details and booking instructions


Apply for this course

Our next year's 2014 programme of courses is now available.

You can book our short courses online. Please click on the link after the relevant course. Alternatively contact the Day and Weekend Programme Administrator at professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk or tel: 01865 270380.

For further information about the Professional Training in the Historic Environment programme, please contact the co-ordinator of the PTHE programme at: pthe@conted.ox.ac.uk.

Payment of fees must be made in full at the time of booking. Please note that businesses and organisations can be invoiced on provision of a Purchase Order and completed application form. These can be emailed to the Day and Weekend Programme Administrator, email: professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk.

Accommodation is often available in Rewley House for those who wish to stay the night before a course. Rooms are modern and comfortably furnished with tea/coffee-making facilities, TV, telephone and private bath or shower room. Please contact the Day and Weekend Programme Administrator, email: professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk or tel: 01865 270380 for availability and prices.