Artefacts and Ecofacts in and out of the Field

Course summary

Artefacts and Ecofacts in and out of the Field



Overview

Archaeological practice over recent years has led to an increasing divergence between those who excavate sites and those who study the artefacts and ecofacts recovered from them. As a result, field archaeologists and those who study artefacts and ecofacts often work in isolation from each other, leading both to the unnecessary collection of material with little information value, and to missed opportunities to recover material of considerable interest.

This course will help you to improve your understanding of why these categories of material are generally collected on archaeological sites, how they are analysed and reported, and how they contribute to interpretation. We will consider the implications of this for approaches to collection, retention and sampling, to promote more informed practice on and off site. The course is open to all but will be of particular benefit to those working in, or towards, supervisory roles in archaeology.

The course will focus on four priority categories of material commonly encountered on archaeological sites. Each will be the subject of a half day session presented by specialists from two leading archaeological practices with many years’ experience of the issues involved.

 

Who is the course aimed for?

The course is aimed at those new to, or moving into, supervisory roles in archaeological fieldwork and those developing specialist skills.

 

Programme details

Monday 15 May

 

8.30 am           Registration and coffee/tea

 

9.00 am           Welcome and introduction

 

9.15 am           Pottery in archaeology:

                        What is collected and why

                        Principles of analysis

                        How pottery is reported

                        What it tells us about the past

                        Implications for site collection practices

 

10.30 am         Discussion and questions

 

10.45 am         Coffee/tea

 

11.15 am         Practical session: pottery reports

(Participants work in groups to review a sample of pottery reports

to identify how a report is put together and what information

it contributes to overall understanding of the site)

 

12.15 pm         Discussion and feedback

 

12.45 pm         Lunch

 

1.45 pm           Building materials in archaeology:

                        What is collected and why

                        Principles of analysis

                        How building material is reported

                        What it tells us about the past

                        Implications for site collection practices

 

2.45 pm           Discussion and questions

 

3.00 pm           Tea / coffee

 

3.15 pm           Practical session: building material reports

(Participants work in groups to review a sample of reports

to identify how a report is put together and what information

it contributes to overall understanding of the site)

 

4.15 pm           Discussion and feedback

 

4.45 pm           End of Day 1

 

7.00pm            Dinner  (residents only)

 

Tuesday 16 May

 

8.00am            Breakfast (residents only)

 

9.00 am           Environmental remains in archaeology:

                        What is collected and why

                        Principles of analysis

                        How environmental remains are reported

                        What they tell us about the past

                        Site sampling strategies

 

10.30 am         Discussion and questions

 

10.45 am         Coffee/tea

 

11.15 am         Practical session: environmental reports

(Participants work in groups to review a sample of reports

to identify how a report is put together and what information

it contributes to overall understanding of the site)

 

12.15 pm         Discussion and feedback

 

12.45 pm         Lunch

 

1.45 pm           Animal bone in archaeology:

                        What is collected and why

                        Principles of analysis

                        How animal bone is reported

                        What it tells us about the past

                        Site sampling approaches

 

2.45 pm           Discussion and questions

 

3.00 pm           Tea / coffee

 

3.15 pm           Practical session: animal bonereports

(Participants work in groups to review a sample of reports

to identify how a report is put together and what information

it contributes to overall understanding of the site)

 

4.15 pm           Discussion and feedback

 

4.45 pm           Course disperses

 

National Occupational Standards for Archaeology: Supports the Performance and Knowledge requirements for CCSAPAD3        

Identify and describe archaeological items; Supports the Knowledge requirements for CCSAPAC8 Undertake analysis and interpretation of archaeological material and data.

Accommodation

Accommodation for this two-day course is at Rewley House for Monday night only.

Depending on availability it may also be possible to extend your stay, please enquire at the time of booking for availability and prices.

All bedrooms are modern, comfortably furnished and each room has tea and coffee making facilities, Freeview television, and Free WiFi and private bath or shower rooms.

Fees

Tuition (includes coffee/tea): £375.00
Baguette Lunch Monday: £4.40
Baguette Lunch Tuesday: £4.40
Dinner Monday: £18.25
Hot Lunch Monday: £13.00
Hot Lunch Tuesday: £13.00
Single B&B Monday night: £72.60

Payment

Payment of fees must be made in full at the time of booking. Please note that businesses and organisations can be invoiced on provision of a Purchase Order and completed application form. These can be emailed to the CWHE Programme Administrator, email: professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk

Tutors

Mr Edward Biddulph

Tutor

Senior Manager and Roman pottery specialist, Oxford Archaeology

Sarah Cobain

Tutor

Post Excavation Manager and environmental specialist, Cotswold Archaeology

Mrs Anne T Dodd

Course Director

Anne Dodd is a senior manager at Oxford Archaeology with many years’ experience of post-excavation management and publication

Kevin Hayward

Tutor

Building Materials Specialist, Pre-Construct Archaeology

Dr Rebecca Nicholson

Tutor

Head of Environmental Archaeology, Oxford Archaeology

Mr Kevin Reilly

Tutor

Archaeozoologist, Pre-Construct Archaeology

Course aims

Course aims and objectives

The aim of the course is to improve understanding of why these categories of material are generally collected on archaeological sites, how they are analysed and reported, and how they contribute to interpretation. The course will also consider the implications of this for approaches to collection, retention and sampling on site, to promote more informed practice on and off site.

Teaching outcomes

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, participants will be expected to: understand why these key categories of material are collected on archaeological sites and what they can contribute to interpretation. Participants will have gained insights into the analytical and reporting methodologies appropriate for these types of material and the implications of this for better and more informed site collection and sampling strategies.

Application

Please use the 'Book' or 'Apply' button on this page. Alternatively, please contact us to obtain an application form.