IARU GSP 2017: Oxford Seminar in Global Challenges of the 21st Century

Course summary

  • Mon 26 Jun 2017 to Sat 22 Jul 2017
  • Programme held at Exeter College, Oxford
  • £3968.00
  • Course code O16I109LDR
  • ipiaru@conted.ox.ac.uk
  • Closed to new applications

IARU GSP 2017: Oxford Seminar in Global Challenges of the 21st Century



Overview

The Oxford Seminar in Global Challenges of the 21st Century is a closed course designed for students currently studying at one of the ten member universities of the International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU) and forms part of the IARU Global Summer Program.

The 2017 Oxford Global Summer Programme offers a general introduction to a range of scientific and development challenges of the 21st century. The course is designed for undergraduates, and it addresses issues of climate change, conservation and urbanisation.

It is assumed that the majority of students will have had a minimum of two years’ study in the humanities, social sciences or sciences. Each student will be expected to work outside their usual area of expertise and be required to adopt methods (scientific/non-scientific) appropriate to the questions posed. However, no prior scientific knowledge is required.

The course will be delivered through tutorials, class meetings, seminars/presentations, project work and discussions as indicated below.

 

Tutorials

Each of the three tutorial days will start with a one-hour plenary session then the students, normally in groups of four, will attend a one-hour tutorial meeting with the tutor. Students will research and write short essays on subjects addressing technological and environmental issues in preparation for each tutorial.

  • Tutorial 1: One essay of 1,500 words
  • Tutorial 2: One essay of 1,500 words
  • Tutorial 3: One essay of 1,500 words

The essays will be assessed and returned with comments by their tutor. Students’ individual contributions to the discussion in the tutorial sessions will be assessed by the tutors.

The topics addressed in the tutorials will be:

  • Tutorial 1: Conservation
  • Tutorial 2: Introduction to the science of climate change
  • Tutorial 3: Technology

Tutorial contact time: 8 hours


Plenary Class

Students will take a six-session course on Urban Challenges for the 21st Century. The students will meet as a whole group (c.16 people). They will prepare one essay of c.2,000 words and this will be assessed by the tutor and returned before the end of the School. Students’ contributions to the class discussion will also be assessed. See below for the course outline.

Class contact time: 12 hours

Student Projects / Role Play

In groups of four, the students will prepare a presentation for a role-play in the final week. (There will be reviews of the near-final drafts in the third week.) Each student will contribute a section of the presentation and of the role-play and the entire project will be followed by questions from both staff and fellow students. The project, its presentation in the form of a role-play and the Q&A session following will be assessed by the programme directors, as will students’ individual contributions as a member of the audience.

The four groups will choose between the following topics, with the two groups in the same theme arguing their position against the other:

  • Theme A :

1. Constructing a dam in Amazonian Ecuador

2. Protecting the Amazonian rainforest Ecuador

  • Theme B :

3. Coal

4. Nuclear

Project contact time: 8 hours


Seminar Presentations

Students will attend three one-hour presentations given by experts drawn primarily from the Oxford Martin School. Students will have the opportunity to ask questions and discuss the content with the presenter. Each session will last for a total of 90 minutes.

The provisional list of topics is:

1. Bio-engineering
2. Conservation
3. Resources

Each presentation will be followed by an informal discussion in the evening, led by a convener and usually lasting one hour.

Seminar contact time: 7.5hours

Recommended reading

Download the preparatory reading for this course

Accommodation

Accommodation and meals are provided in Exeter College in central Oxford. The college is one of the University’s oldest and details can be found on its website at www.exeter.ox.ac.uk.

  • Participants will have a single study-bedroom, with shared bathroom and toilet facilities. The college buildings are mainly four storeys high and access to bedrooms is by stairs only. (Applicants with mobility problems should contact us at an early stage to discuss arrangements.)
  • Meals are provided in the college dining Hall. The first meal is lunch on Monday 26 June and the last is breakfast on Saturday 22 July. No lunches are provided at weekends.

Additional information:

  • Students must arrive by 12.30 (lunchtime) on Monday 26 June 2017.
  • Students will be able to check in from 11.00 (am) on the Monday 26 June 2017.
  • Students must check out by 09.30 on Saturday 22 July 2017.

Please note that:

  • Students cannot be accommodated either before or after the programme;
  • The final event concludes at 21.30 on Friday 21 July.

Libraries

Students will be given Summer Readers’ Tickets for the Bodleian Library, the University’s reference library.

Students may also find it helpful to ensure that they have access enabled through VPN and eduroam (or equivalent) with the library resources of their home institution.

Fees

Programme Fee: £3968.00

Payment

Fees

Tuition fees: GBP 1,137
Accommodation, including any deposits: GBP 2,831
Textbook fees (estimate): c. GBP 110
Living expenses (estimate): c. GBP 440
Visa fee (estimate): c. GBP 85
(For those that need to apply for a UK Student Visitor Visa)

Once we have received acceptances from students of our offer of a place, invoices will be issued. Invoices are due for payment by mid-May and the official letters confirming places on the programme will then be issued.

Insurance

Students are very strongly recommended to ensure that they have adequate medical insurance to cover dental charges, doctor’s bills and hospital charges.

No medical cover is provided by the Programme or by Oxford University.

Students would also be wise to have insurance that covers the loss of, or damage to, personal items, especially electronic devices.

Tutors

Professor Michele Acuto

Tutor

Dr Stephen Barlow

Director & Tutor

Dr Justin Bishop

Director & Tutor

Prof Angus Hawkins

Chair

Course aims

  • To acquire a critical and informed understanding of some of the global challenges confronting humanity in the 21st century.
  • To appreciate the inter-relation between aspects of scientific, technological and developmental issues of the 21st century.
  • To apply the knowledge acquired from the programme.
  • To develop critical skills within a more sophisticated understanding of particular aspects of human development and the implications for the future.
  • To extend the knowledge of issues and challenges beyond the student’s own area of disciplinary study.
  • To research and produce analytical work within tightly specified deadlines, requiring effective research skills and the rapid assimilation and analysis of complex information.
  • To work with a group of peers from different parts of the world and to extend the student’s awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences.

Teaching methods

The course will be delivered through tutorials, class meetings, seminars/presentations, project work and discussions as outlined above.

Learning outcomes

  • To acquire a critical and informed understanding of some of the global challenges confronting humanity in the 21st century.
  • To appreciate the inter-relation between aspects of scientific, technological and developmental issues of the 21st century.
  • To apply the knowledge acquired from the programme.
  • To develop critical skills within a more sophisticated understanding of particular aspects of human development and the implications for the future.
  • To extend the knowledge of issues and challenges beyond the student’s own area of disciplinary study.
  • To research and produce analytical work within tightly specified deadlines, requiring effective research skills and the rapid assimilation and analysis of complex information.
  • To work with a group of peers from different parts of the world and to extend the student’s awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences.

Assessment methods

Marking Scheme

Tutorials

            3 essays, together worth                                      = 40 marks
            Contribution to discussion in tutorials               = 10 marks

Plenary Class

            1 essay worth                                                         = 15 marks
            Contribution to discussion in classes                 = 5 marks

Group Project / Role Play

           PowerPoint Presentation                                      = 20 marks
           Delivery                                                                  = 10 marks

 

Marking scale

          Distinction:                                                             70% and above
          High Pass:                                                               60 – 69%
          Low Pass:                                                                50 – 59%
          Fail:                                                                         49% and below


Credit

10 ECTS (estimated) credits. The University of Oxford does not award credit. However, for this programme we assess the credit equivalent in ECTS as being c. 10 ECTS.

Contact Hours

35.5 total contact hours (classroom)

Tutorials:                                                                            8.0 hours
Classes:                                                                             12.0 hours

Project:                          preparation classes:                   2.0 hours                 
                                       presentation day (min.):             6.0 hours

Seminars:                      presentations                              4.5 hours

                                       discussions                                  3 .0 hours

Total contact hours:                                                    35.5 hours  


This is an intense and demanding course requiring around 150 hours of private study work.

Application

IARU students should contact the GSP Co-ordinator at their own University for an application form and guidance; see http://www.iaruni.org/for-students/global-summer-program/how-to-apply. Please note that the application period closes in early March

Selection criteria

Entry Requiremetns

The prerequisite is a minimum of two years’ study in the areas of humanities, social sciences, and sciences. No prior scientific knowledge is assumed.

Language Skills

If the language of instruction at the home university is English, there is no need for applicants to provide proof of their fluency in English.

Students from other institutions with recent qualifications in English, such as TOEFL, IELTS or a Cambridge qualification, should include details of the mark or grade they achieved. If they do not hold such qualifications, they should provide a note stating how many years they have studied English and they should arrange for their Study Abroad Officer or an academic who knows them well to provide a reference outlining their skills in English.

Preparatory Work

Students are expected to have completed preparatory reading work prior to arrival.

Download the preparatory reading for this course