Introduction to Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology

Overview

Mycenae, the Parthenon, Olympia, Venus de Milo: a few examples of how Ancient Greece laid the foundations of Western civilisation. Today, this cultural phenomenon continues to generate knowledge, inspiration and fascination for specialists and non specialists alike. Join us for a visually rich course, in which we will explore the art and archaeology of Ancient Greece through a variety of lectures and other learning resources, including museum collections.

We will focus on major categories of Ancient Greek art and archaeology, such as pottery, architecture and sculpture, and will follow these from the Minoan until the Hellenistic period (ca. 3100-31 BCE). In the process, we will unravel the ways in which they can give us a wealth of information about how people lived and thought in past societies.

Programme details

Course begins: 5th May 2022

Week 1:          Introduction to archaeology, art and Ancient Greece

Week 2:          Architecture: Minoan to Geometric

Week 3:          Architecture: Archaic to Hellenistic

Week 4:          Pottery: Minoan to Geometric

Week 5:          Pottery: Archaic to Hellenistic

Week 6:          Sculpture: Minoan to Geometric

Week 7:          Sculpture: Archaic to Hellenistic

Week 8:          Museum visit

Week 9:          Chronological Composition: history, society, aesthetics

Week 10:        Art, Archaeology and Society then and now

Certification

Students who register for CATS points will receive a Record of CATS points on successful completion of their course assessment.

To earn credit (CATS points) you will need to register and pay an additional £10 fee per course. You can do this by ticking the relevant box at the bottom of the enrolment form or when enrolling online.

Coursework is an integral part of all weekly classes and everyone enrolled will be expected to do coursework in order to benefit fully from the course. Only those who have registered for credit will be awarded CATS points for completing work at the required standard.

Students who do not register for CATS points during the enrolment process can either register for CATS points prior to the start of their course or retrospectively from the January 1st after the current full academic year has been completed. If you are enrolled on the Certificate of Higher Education you need to indicate this on the enrolment form but there is no additional registration fee.

Fees

Description Costs
Course Fee £229.00
Take this course for CATS points £10.00

Tutor

Dr Anna Simandiraki-Grimshaw

Dr. Anna Simandiraki-Grimshaw is an Aegean Bronze Age archaeologist. She lectures in Archaeology at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, among other institutions. She is also affiliated with Durham University and Humboldt University in Berlin.

Course aims

To introduce students to the art and archaeology of Ancient Greece (from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times) through a diachronic exploration of major categories, such as architecture, sculpture and pottery.

Course Objectives:

1. To teach and analyse the most important specimens of Ancient Greek art and archaeology;

2. To explore the aesthetic, social, political and other origins and influences of Ancient Greek art and archaeology;

3. To enable students to critically approach a past system of aesthetics, creativity and ideological expression by exploring concrete examples of Ancient Greek material culture.

Teaching methods

A variety of teaching and learning methods will be used, taking into consideration students' different learning styles and possible special needs. We will use tutor presentations and explanations, substantial visual material and handouts, some documentary footage and extensive discussion.

Students will study between sessions and will progress through a workbook according to their evolving understanding and skills.

During group presentations main topics will be analysed by different teams. We will also use props. There will be the opportunity of on-site learning during a museum visit in session 8 (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford).

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

1. Recall and analyse the most important specimens of Ancient Greek art and archaeology;

2. Discuss and evaluate the aesthetic, social, political and other origins and influences of Ancient Greek art and archaeology;

3. Critically approach a past system of aesthetics, creativity and ideological expression by exploring concrete examples of Ancient Greek material culture.

Assessment methods

For this course, all students will be given a workbook at the second session (Option A). This will contain guidance material and five questions, the answers to which will become apparent as we progress through the course. Students will be expected to draw on both what is covered in class and on their private study, reflection and museum visit(s). They will be expected to demonstrate their progression and development by completing the workbook and handing it in by the last session. The entire length of the answers should be approximately 1500 words, i.e. about 300 words for each answer. 

In the case of students who are unable to complete the workbook (e.g. who feel that their learning styles are not compatible), the tutor will be flexible in accommodating other ways of equivalent written assessment (Option B). 

Student progress will also be evaluated on the basis of analysis, collaboration, organisation and knowledge, as demonstrated during class activities.

Students must submit a completed Declaration of Authorship form at the end of term when submitting their final piece of work. CATS points cannot be awarded without the aforementioned form - Declaration of Authorship form

Application

To earn credit (CATS points) for your course you will need to register and pay an additional £10 fee per course. You can do this by ticking the relevant box at the bottom of the enrolment form or when enrolling online.

Please use the 'Book' or 'Apply' button on this page. Alternatively, please complete an application form.

Level and demands

Most of the Department's weekly classes have 10 or 20 CATS points assigned to them. 10 CATS points at FHEQ Level 4 usually consist of ten 2-hour sessions. 20 CATS points at FHEQ Level 4 usually consist of twenty 2-hour sessions. It is expected that, for every 2 hours of tuition you are given, you will engage in eight hours of private study.

Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme (CATS)