Rewley House Studies in the Historic Environment

This series of books, the Rewley House Studies in the Historic Environment, published by Shaun Tyas, builds on a long tradition of publishing the proceedings of selected Oxford University Continuing Education weekend schools. Each volume provides an overview of a subject, and seeks to make current scholarship available to a wide audience.

Copies may be ordered from the publisher post-free within the UK, or through any bookseller. Please contact the publisher, Shaun Tyas: email: shaun@shauntyas.myzen.co.uk; telephone: 01775 821542; address: 1 High Street Donington, Lincolnshire, PE11 4TA

Series Editor: Dr Paul Barnwell, Director of Studies in the Historic Environment
Editorial Board: Professor Malcolm Airs, Dr Geoffrey Tyack, Professor William Whyte

Learn more about the many part-time courses and programmes offered in architectural history. at Oxford's Department for Continuing Education.

Volume 1: The Medieval Great House

Edited by Malcolm Airs and P.S. Barnwell

May 2011 saw the launch of a new series of books - the 'Rewley House Studies in the Historic Environment' - based on the Department's weekend schools in architectural history.

The first volume is The Medieval Great House, and completes an earlier series of books on greater houses begun by Professor Malcolm Airs many years ago.

The great house was one of the defining cultural artefacts of the Middle Ages. It was the seat of power and influence, the expression of the aristocratic household, the theatre for hospitality and courtly society, a focal point in the landscape.

Despite this, it has attracted relatively little scholarly attention, overshadowed in the popular mind by the appeal of the great castles and cathedrals. The contributors to this volume draw on the disciplines of architectural and art and social history, archaeology and landscape analysis, to explore the character and significance of the medieval great house in England, Scotland and Wales.

Among the themes covered are the relationship between the great house and the castle, the social and economic functions of the non-military houses of the elite, and the layout and ornamentation of the interiors. The nature of the evidence, different kinds of analysis and challenges to interpretation are all explored in this collection of essays which reflects the current state of scholarship concerning these important artefacts of medieval civilisation.

The papers in this volume represent the essence of a weekend conference held at Rewley House in Oxford in January 2008, and is the first of a new series publishing the Rewley House architectural conferences, but it is the successor to the important earlier series of conference proceedings published by Rewley House itself since 1996. The volume is introduced and concluded, and indexed. The contributors are Anthony Emery, Philip Dixon, Richard Oram, Charles McKean, Richard Suggett, Maurice Howard, Andor Gomme, Pete Smith, Nicholas Cooper, Andrea Kirkham, Kent Rawlinson, Peter Brears, Stephen Monkhouse and P. S. Barnwell.

Volume 2: Country House Technology

Edited by P.S. Barnwell and Marilyn Palmer

The importance of the country house as a pioneer of 'taste' has long been a popular subject for art and architectural historians - but its role as a pioneer of new technology has received less attention.

Country houses were modernised in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with the introduction of plumbing, gas and electricity supplies, and gadgetry of all kinds. These changes affected the lives and comfort of all who lived and worked on the estates, and they influenced the wider world.

In May 2010 a weekend conference at Rewley House in Oxford brought together recent research on country house technology, building on earlier work by the National Trust on its own properties, especially reflected in the availability of many of the illustrations found here.

This unique, pioneering book combines the proceedings of that conference with two newly-commissioned essays. There are thirteen chapters, including an introduction and a summing up by the editors, and an index. The book includes a broad range of technologies and presents examples drawn from across Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

The contributors are Marilyn Palmer, Christine Hiskey, Pete Smith, Paul Holden, Pamela Sambrook, Maureen Dillon, Ian West, Christopher Hunwick, Paul Thomas, Fiona Fyfe, Susanna Wade Martins and P. S. Barnwell.

Volume 3: Sir George Gilbert Scott 1811-1878

Edited by P.S. Barnwell, Geoffrey Tyack and William Whyte

Sir George Gilbert Scott was one of the leading figures of the Gothic Revival in England. His output, and that of his office, was prodigious: it changed the architectural face of England, and its influence was felt across the British Empire. He became a pillar of the high Victorian establishment, receiving a knighthood and burial at Westminster Abbey following a funeral at which Queen Victoria was personally represented.

Even in his own day, however, he was a controversial figure, and for much of the twentieth century, when the Gothic Revival was despised, he was unappreciated, even reviled. More recently, however, he has begun to attract greater interest.

The essays in this volume represent a step towards a more balanced appreciation of his work, from a conference held at Rewley House in Oxford in 2011 to mark the two hundred years since his birth.

Leading architectural historians contribute to this scholarly volume. There are twelve essays. Gavin Stamp provides an overview on Scott's life and work (1-21); Chris Miele examines the young Scott (22-48); Geoff Brandwood examines 'Scott as London Church Builder', 49-69; G. A. Bremner writes on the colonial cathedrals Scott built 1846-74, 70-90; Claudia Marx examines Scott's legacy as a restorer of major churches, 91-111; Geoffrey Tyack examines 'Scott in Oxford', 112-133 and Simon Bradley 'Scott and Cambridge', 134-57; Peter Howell writes on Scott's little-known work as a country house architect, 158-71; M. H. Port looks at Scott's work as a state architect (especially the Foreign Office design), 172-92; Kimberley Frost writes on Scott's design process for the University of Glasgow, 193-212; William Whyte on the influence of Scott's work on other practices, 213-29 and finally Geoffrey Tyack and William Whyte sum up the Scott legacy over the last two hundred years, 230-37. The book concludes with a bibliography and an index.

Volume 4: Places of Worship in Britain and Ireland, 300-950

Edited by P.S. Barnwell

Starting with evidence for Christian sites and building in Roman Britain, the book examines the formative period of Christianity in the British Isles, and looks at regions with differing degrees of Roman legacy and varying histories of conversion – all of which have left different kinds of evidence, and are therefore rarely studied together.

This is the 4th volume of Rewley House Studies in the Historic Environment, and the first in a chronological series concerning places of worship on Britain and Ireland from the late Roman period to the present.

The contributors are leading experts in their fields, who draw in a wide range of archaeological, architectural, art-historical, epigraphical, historical, landscape and sculptural material to illuminate this important and exciting period.

They not only describe and characterise religious buildings, sites and landscapes, but also consider their historical context, how they illuminate the development of the Church, how they were used for worship, and how contemporaries perceived them.

The book contains 11 essays by leading specialists: Barbara Yorke provides an introductory chapter on 'Churches and the Christianisation of Early Medieval Britain' (1-14); Martin Henig, 'The Origins of Christian Britain: From Mystery Cult to Christian Mystery', 15-32; Nancy Edwards, 'Christianising the Landscape: the Archaeology of the Early Medieval Church in Wales', 33-55; Tomás Ó Carragáin, 'More Scottorum: Buildings of Worship in Ireland, c.500-950', 56-67; Sally M. Foster, 'Physical Evidence for the Early Church in Scotland', 68-91; Meg Boulton and Jane Hawkes, 'The Anglo-Saxon Church in Kent', 92-118; Richard Morris, 'Landscapes of Conversion among the Deirans: Lastingham and its Neighbours in the Seventh and Eighth Centuries', 119-51; Rosemary Cramp, 'Northumbrian Churches', 152-68; David Parsons, 'The Early Medieval Church at Brixworth, Northamptonshire', 169-85; Michael Hare and Maggie Kneen, 'The Church of St Mary, Deerhurst, Gloucestershire, in the Ninth Century', 186-208; and P. S. Barnwell, 'Conclusion: Churches, Sites, Landscapes', 209-26; Index, 227-37; other relevant titles, 238-40. The book contains 14 colour pictures and 60 in black and white.

Volume 5: Places of Worship in Britain and Ireland, 950-1150

Edited by P. S. Barnwell

This is the second in a chronological series of volumes concerning places of worship in Britain and Ireland form the late Roman period to the present. It covers the age of reform, during which western Christianity acquired most of its distinctive features, and saw the maturation of the diocesan system of administering the secular church, the beginnings of the creation of parishes, and the foundation and initial spread of many of the monastic orders which were to be so important a feature of the central middle ages.

The contributors come from a number of academic disciplines—archaeology, and architectural, art, landscape and liturgical history—to illustrate a variety of approaches to understanding surviving buildings and sites of the period. They describe and characterise the buildings an landscapes of a range of different types of religious institutions during the period, and consider their historical context, the evidence they provide for the development of the Church, and the evidence they contain for contemporary attitudes to worship and for liturgical and devotional practice.

The book contains eleven essays by leading specialists: Eric Fernie, provides an introduction, followed by John Harper, on liturgy and music. Marie-Pierre Gelin discusses monastic cathedrals; Julian Luxford the nature of Benedictine art and architecture; Glyn Coppack the earliest phases of Cistercian monasteries; Richard Fawcett the Tironensians (particularly in Scotland); Paul Everson and David Stocker the place of the Premonstratensian house of Barlings in the Lincolnshire landscape; Richard Oram monasteries and monastic schools in northern England and eastern Scotland; Paul Barnwell local churches in England; Tomás Ó Carragáin the evidence from Ireland. Paul Barnwell also provides a conclusion.

Volume 6: Architect, Patron and Craftsman in Tudor and Early Stuart England

Edited by P. S. Barnwell and Paula Henderson

This book contains the papers from a weekend conference held in Rewley House in 2016 in honour of Professor Malcolm Airs who taught there from 1975 to 2006, and whose scholarship has centred on the domestic architecture of the Tudor and Early Stuart Period, particularly on building processes and craftsmen. It was a period in which Gothic elements continued to be used but mixed with details inspired by Classical antiquity. This was the English Renaissance, but the systematic use of Classical models, and the publication of handbooks of Classical architecture, and the profession of architecture were all in their infancy. The blend of styles is unique to England: while it used to be dismissed as backward it is today celebrated for its inventiveness and pioneering achievements.

In these papers many of Professor Airs’ friends and colleagues pay tribute to his scholarship in a series of essays on topics which have interested him. The contents include an appreciation of Professor Airs’ career by William Whyte, Nicholas Cooper on the historiography of the Tudor and Jacobean house, detailed examination of Wollaton Hall by Pete Smith and of planning at Doddington Hall and Ham House by David Adshead; and discussion elite houses in London by Paula Henderson, of garden cloisters and terraces by Sally Jeffery, and of the Schools Quadrangle at Oxford by Geoffrey Tyack. Thematic papers include Maurice Howard on painted panelling and furnishing, Claire Gapper on patrons, plasterers and architects, and Kathryn Davies on vernacular wall-paintings. The volume concludes with a discussion by Mark Girouard of his forthcoming biographical dictionary of architects of the period.

Volume 7: Places of Worship in Britain and Ireland, 1150-1350

Edited by P. S. Barnwell

This book is the third in a series on Places of Worship in Britain and Ireland, which will ultimately extend to the twenty-first century. The period considered in this volume saw the rise of the great cathedrals, the spread of reformed monasticism (including nunneries), the coming of the friars, and the spread of the parish system into every corner of Britain and Ireland. Architecturally, the emergence and spread of the Gothic style is of special significance, but as important was the evolution of plan and form to accommodate new forms of worship driven by developments in theology and liturgy.

The richness of the period is such that there is no attempt to be comprehensive. Rather, the emphasis is on the main kinds of institution, and particularly those for which good physical remains can still be seen. Cathedrals, monasteries of the larger orders, nunneries, friaries and parish churches are all represented, in some instances with examples drawn from across Britain and Ireland, in others with a focus on a particular area. The dominant themes are the maturation of the medieval church, the permeation of Christian values and institutions throughout society, and the creation of the universal Church of the middle ages binding Britain and Ireland, and the western Church as a whole, into a broadly common religious culture. Wherever possible, consideration is given to the ways in which buildings were used, and there are chapters on the development of liturgy and on the importance of images to liturgical and devotional practices.

Volume 8: Places of Worship in Britain and Ireland, 1350-1550

Edited by P. S. Barnwell

Front cover: Place of Worship in Britain and Ireland, 1350-1550. Edited by P.S. BarnwellThis book is the fourth in a series on Places of Worship in Britain and Ireland, which will ultimately extend to the twenty-first century. The period covered by this volume is often seen as one of decline and is over-shadowed by the great changes of the sixteenth-century Reformation. Taking the period on its own terms, however, the contributors to this volume show that there was much innovation, vitality and creativeness as much in worship as in architecture. The main focus for much of the innovation was in collegiate churches, but parish buildings and worship continued to evolve, and established institutions, including cathedrals and many monastic houses, adapted to the new circumstances.

The richness of the period, and variations across Britain and Ireland, are such that comprehensive treatment is not possible. There is an emphasis on the main types of institution, on those of which there are good physical remains, and on what was distinctive to the age. Cathedrals, monasteries of some of the larger orders, colleges and parishes are all discussed. Themes include the kinds of architectural expression adopted by different institutions in the various parts of Britain and Ireland, the adaptation of earlier buildings to meet changing requirements, the elaboration of both buildings and the liturgy, and the near saturation of society with a religious culture. As in other volumes in the series, consideration is, wherever possible, given to the ways in which the buildings were used and experienced.

Cloth-bound sewn hardback with colour dustwrapper. Many illustrations in full colour, index. Essays by Nicola Coldstream, John Harper, Sarah Brown, Philippa Turner, Cathy Oakes, Glyn Coppack, Richard Oram, Richard Fawcett, Lizzie Swarbrick, Rachel Moss, Madeleine Gray, and P. S. Barnwell.