Dr Mark Smith

Director of Studies in Local History; Course Director, MSc in English Local History

Biography

Mark Smith was educated at Jesus College, Oxford, BA (1982), D.Phil. (1987). He was formerly Lecturer in the Modern History of Christianity at King’s College London and is now University Lecturer and Director of Studies in Local and Social History.

Teaching

Dr Smith directs the part-time D.Phil programme in Local History and the MSc in English Local History. He teaches courses on the theory and practice of local history, religion and community in the nineteenth century and modern sources for local history. Mark also provides teaching on industrial society and on post-reformation religion for the Diploma in English Local history and directs a series of weekly classes and Day-schools across the field of local and social history.

Research interests

Mark’s research interests are focussed mainly on the history of religion from the eighteenth to the twentieth century with a particular emphasis on the history of the Church of England and of Anglophone evangelical movements. His current research projects include Church party and Church reform in the early nineteenth century,  a history of Evangelical parish ministry 1780-1980 and an AHRC/ESRC funded research network on relationships between Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism in Britain.

Publications

Books

Religion in Industrial Society: Oldham and Saddleworth 1740-1865. (Clarendon Press, 1994), pp xi + 311.

Doing the Duty of the Parish: Surveys of the Church in Hampshire 1810. (Hampshire Record Series, 2004), pp. lxvii + 202.

M. Smith and S. Taylor (eds.) Evangelicalism in the Church of England c.1790- c.1900 (Boydell, 2004), pp. xii + 339.

M. Smith (ed.) British Evangelical Identities Past and Present: Aspects of the History and Sociology of Evangelicalism in Britain and Ireland (Paternoster Press, 2008), pp. xv + 283.

Chapters in books and articles

‘The Reception of Richard Podmore: Anglicanism in Saddleworth 1700-1830’, in J. Walsh, C. Haydon, S. Taylor (eds), The Church of England c.1689- c.1833 (Cambridge University Press, 1993), pp. 110-123.

‘A foundation of influence: The Oxford Pastorate and elite recruitment in early twentieth-century Anglican Evangelicalism’, in D. W. Lovegrove, (ed.), The Rise of the Laity in Evangelical Protestantism (Routledge, 2002), pp. 202-213.

‘St Paul’s and its Parishes c.1750-c.1870’ in D. Keene, A. Burns and A. Saint (eds.), St Paul’s: The Cathedral Church of London 604-2004 (Yale, 2004) pp. 372-380.

‘Religion’, in C. Williams (ed.), A Companion to Nineteenth Century Britain (Blackwell, 2004) pp. 337-52.

‘Primary Visitation Charge of Henry Ryder to the Diocese of Gloucester’, in M. Smith and S. Taylor (eds.)  Evangelicalism in the Church of England c.1790- c.1900 (Boydell, 2004), pp. 51-107.

‘Thomas Burgess Churchman and Reformer’ in N. Yates (ed.) Bishop Burgess and his World (University of Wales Press, 2007) pp. 5-40.

‘William Wilberforce’, in A. Atherstone (ed.), The Heart of Faith (Lutterworth Press, 2008) pp. 71-80.

‘The Roots of Resurgence: Evangelical Parish ministry in the mid-Twentieth Century’, in Cooper and Gregory (eds) Studies in Church History 44 Revival and Resurgence in Christian History (Boydell, 2008) pp. 318-328.

‘The Missionary Statesman and the Missionary Saint: Henry Venn’s Life of Francis Xavier’, in M. Smith (ed.), British Evangelical Identities Past and Present: Aspects of the History and Sociology of Evangelicalism in Britain and Ireland (Paternoster Press, 2008), pp. 238-252.